Curriculum Filter Results

Is the Globe Warming? Is there Evidence in the Great Lakes Region?

After completing this activity, students will be able to:
  • Critically interpret graphic data.
  • Evaluate and discuss the difficulties inherent in interpreting and forecasting long- and short-term trends.
  • Analyze data, draw conclusions about whether there is evidence of global warming, and defend their conclusions.

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What Happens to Heat Energy Reaching the Great Lakes?

Even as far back as the “log cabin days,” people knew that water absorbs a great deal of heat energy and can in turn release this heat. Pioneers would prevent foods from freezing on cold nights by placing a large container of water in the room. Can you think of why this might work? In this investigation we will explore how bodies of water can affect the surrounding areas.

Objectives:

  • Describe how soil and water differ in their ability to absorb and release heat energy.
  • Describe how this difference in heat absorbed or released affects the atmosphere immediately above the land and immediately above the water.

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Implications of Warming in the Arctic

Besides being a “canary in the coal mine,” why should we learn about global warming in the Arctic?

Objectives:

  • Explain feedback loops including surface reflectivity (albedo), ocean circulation, melting permafrost releasing heat-trapping gasses and melting ice contributing to rising sea levels.
  • Explain how warming in the Arctic affects the rest of the world.

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What Evidence of Glaciation Exists in the Great Lakes Region?

The Great Lakes Basin was once covered by the ice of continental glaciers. About 15,000 years ago the last ice melted to expose the lake basin. There have been minor advances and retreats of glaciers since then causing the level of the water in the lakes to rise and fall. How do scientists determine these past lake levels?

Objectives:

  • Identify the evidence of ancient beach ridges.
  • Become aware of the uses of ancient beach ridges today.

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How Did Rocks and Rivers Shape the Great Lakes?

After completing this activity, each student will be able to:
  • Relate the hardness of rocks to topography and lake depth.
  • Describe the topography of the Great Lakes area.
  • Relate the pre-glacial drainage system to the present size and position of the Great Lakes.

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How well do you know the Great Lakes?

In this activity, learners will construct the five Great Lakes from string and use paper “water” and “fish” to show comparisons between the lakes.

After completing this activity, students will be able to:
  • Compare and contrast the differences between the Great Lakes in water volumes, length of shoreline, human population distribution, and the amount of fish harvested from each lake.

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