Lake Ontario Shipboard Science: Day 6

July 14, 2018

I never knew that…

We are all connected by the Great Lakes what an eye-opener it was being on the Lake Guardian for the last six days.

Lake Ontario is the last of the Great Lakes before the ocean and is impacted from what every community does along the shorelines of the other four Great Lakes and all of their tributaries.

[1]

Today was a busy day for all of us. We worked on and finished our research projects, some of us presented our classroom lessons, and we had three stations in which we collected water and plankton samples.

I never knew that…

A simple M&M experiment to discover which wavelengths of visible light penetrated furthest into Lake Ontario or any local waterway could represent so much more.

I never knew that…

The EPA, USGS, NOAA, The Center for Great Lakes Literacy, SUNY ESF, SUNY Owsego, and Clarkson University are all working together on monitoring the Great Lakes.

 

I never knew that…

That the Thousand Islands Biological Station, operated by the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, existed on an island adjacent to Clayton, NY. This area is dedicated as a research area that focuses on the aquatic ecology of the river with emphasis on fisheries, wetlands, limnology and invasive species. During the time the station is open they offer teachers the opportunity to take the students there for a tour.

I never knew that…

Research could be so tedious as we sampled the water for plankton, water chemistry, and sediment; often into the early morning hours.

I never knew that…

That lake sturgeon could live to be over 100 years old, why they were killed in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, and the work done to help restore this population of fish. This fish species was alive during the time of the dinosaurs and humans almost made them go extinct.

I never knew that…

How new technology is changing the way scientists are analyzing data. That DNA is being used to track fish species and microbial pollution sources in coastal waters.

Gregory Boyer, PhD and Lauren (Lou) Sassoubre, PhD

I never knew that…

That mysis moved in water levels daily depending upon time of day. During the day mysis hide from predators in the benthic layer and at night they travel up the water column near the thermocline.

I never knew that…

Oswego was the last commercial port on Lake Ontario.

I never knew that…

I would meet so many hard working and dedicated people trying to improve the Great Lakes all while on “vacation”.

 

Written by Tina Spencer and Darlene Bissonette

[1] http://seagrant.sunysb.edu/articles/t/poster-the-great-lakes-basin-great-lakes-coastal-youth-education-news as viewed on 7/14/18