Curriculum Filter Results

How fast can a shoreline change?

Ohio’s Lake Erie shoreline consists of wetlands, low bluffs, and gently sloping shore in the western one-third of the state and glacial till and soft shale bluffs in the eastern two-thirds of the state. The rate of shore erosion is affected by the kind of land and rock materials and the use of protective structures. Use map reading skills to recognize some shoreline features on aerial photos, observe changes in a shoreline over time, and observe the effects of shoreline devices on rates of erosion.

Downloads:

Details

Subject Areas:
Grade Levels: ,
Topics: ,
Great Lakes Literacy Principles:


What evidence of glaciation exists in the Great Lakes region?

The Great Lakes Basin was once covered by the ice of continental glaciers. About 15,000 years ago the last ice melted to expose the lake basin. There have been minor advances and retreats of glaciers since then causing the level of the water in the lakes to rise and fall. How do scientists determine these past lake levels? Use mapping skills to identify the evidence of ancient beach ridges and  become aware of the uses of ancient beach ridges today.

Downloads:

Details

Subject Areas:
Grade Levels: ,
Topics: ,
Great Lakes Literacy Principles:


How did rocks and rivers shape the Great Lakes?

The rocks in the Great Lakes Basin are of two main types: metamorphic/igneous and sedimentary. The metamorphic/igneous rocks formed long ago, when molten rock hardened and the heat changed other rocks nearby without melting them. This happened over one billion years ago. The sedimentary rocks in the Great Lakes Basin formed in an ocean that covered most of the basin beginning about 600 million years ago. Use maps skills to relate the hardness of rocks to topography and lake depth, describe the topography of the Great Lakes area, and relate the pre-glacial drainage system to the present size and
position of the Great Lakes.

Downloads:

Details

Subject Areas:
Grade Levels: , ,
Topics: ,
Great Lakes Literacy Principles:


What causes the shoreline to erode?

Shorelines along the Great Lakes vary in the nature of their sediments and resistance to erosion. Natural causes of erosion include waves, currents, and effects of wind and storms on shoreline processes. Simulate the processes of shoreline erosion to investigate the ongoing changes in coastal areas.

Downloads:

Details

Subject Areas:
Grade Levels: ,
Topics: ,
Great Lakes Literacy Principles:


How Fast Can a Shoreline Change?

Shoreline and bluff erosion has been identified by shoreline residents as a critical problem along some parts of the Great Lakes. Land losses of up to 10 feet per year have been estimated for some areas. Property damage totals millions of dollars. Land loss and property damage are caused by the conflict between natural forces and human activity along the shoreline.

Objectives:

  • Recognize some shoreline features on aerial photos.
  • Observe changes in a shoreline over time.
  • Observe the effects of shoreline devices on rates of erosion.

External Curriculum Materials

Details

Subject Areas:
Grade Levels: ,
Topics: , , , ,
Great Lakes Literacy Principles:


What Evidence of Glaciation Exists in the Great Lakes Region?

The Great Lakes Basin was once covered by the ice of continental glaciers. About 15,000 years ago the last ice melted to expose the lake basin. There have been minor advances and retreats of glaciers since then causing the level of the water in the lakes to rise and fall. How do scientists determine these past lake levels?

Objectives:

  • Identify the evidence of ancient beach ridges.
  • Become aware of the uses of ancient beach ridges today.

External Curriculum Materials

Details

Subject Areas:
Grade Levels: ,
Topics: , , ,
Great Lakes Literacy Principles:


How Did Rocks and Rivers Shape the Great Lakes?

After completing this activity, each student will be able to:
  • Relate the hardness of rocks to topography and lake depth.
  • Describe the topography of the Great Lakes area.
  • Relate the pre-glacial drainage system to the present size and position of the Great Lakes.

External Curriculum Materials

Details

Subject Areas:
Grade Levels:
Topics: ,
Great Lakes Literacy Principles:


Ooze Clues, Diatom Ooze

Plot the distribution of various oozes using information from sediment maps.
Objectives:
  • Describe the characterless of different types of seafloor sediments and oozes
  • Predict distribution of calcareous and siliceous oozes.
  • Compare and discuss locations of sediments and oozes.

External Curriculum Materials

Details

Subject Areas:
Grade Levels: ,
Topics: , ,
Great Lakes Literacy Principles:


Lake Effect Snow

The Great Lakes create unique weather patterns. One of those weather patterns is lake effect snow. Lake effect snowstorms occur in only three places in the world: the Great Lakes, the east shore of Hudson Bay and along the west coasts of the Japanese islands of Honshu and Hokkaido. While people in the snow belt regions have learned to adapt, living near the lakes and experiencing lake effect snow still affects the economy and culture in significant ways. For example, winter sports like skiing and snowmobiling are major industries in some snow areas. This lesson explores how the Great Lakes influence lake effect snow, other factors that contribute to it and ways of reading weather conditions to forecast lake effect storms.

Objectives:

  • Describe the factors that create lake effect snow.
  • Describe how differences in lake and air temperature relate to lake effect snow.
  • Describe weather conditions associated with the movement of frontal boundaries across the Great Lakes region.
  • Describe how hills and highlands help form clouds and precipitation.
  • Describe how cities and industrial areas are related to lake effect snow.

External Curriculum Materials

Details

Subject Areas:
Grade Levels: ,
Topics: , ,
Great Lakes Literacy Principles: , ,