Curriculum Search Results: wetlands

Hydropoly: A Decision Making Game

Students play a board game to hone their decision-making skills. Through the various choices posed in the game, they are asked to consider both economic and environmental well being in making decisions.

Objectives:
  • Discuss land-use practices that affect Great Lakes wetlands
  • Make decisions and recognize personal priorities with regard to wetlands
  • Describe some of the economic factors that often drive land use

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How Fast Can a Shoreline Change?

Ohio’s Lake Erie shoreline consists of wetlands, low bluffs, and gently sloping shore in the western one-third of the state and glacial till and soft shale bluffs in the eastern two-thirds of the state. The rate of shore erosion is affected by the kind of land and rock materials and the use of protective structures. Use map reading skills to recognize some shoreline features on aerial photos, observe changes in a shoreline over time, and observe the effects of shoreline devices on rates of erosion.

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Wetland in a Pan

Students review a selection of career profiles and play a lively classroom game to find out more about marine and aquatic science professionals.

Objectives:

  • Observe building a model wetland.
  • Understand that wetlands are defined by plants, soil and water.
  • Identify some wetland types and their location.
  • Relate importance of wetland function to people’s needs and daily lives.

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Environmental Decision Making

Every day we make choices. We decide simple things like what to wear, what to eat, or how much time to allow for homework. Some decisions, however, require us to think critically and consider the potential consequences of our actions. When it comes to making environmental decisions there is often no clear right or wrong. However, many factors must be considered, especially since the environment is held in the public trust. When making environmental decisions, it often means the decision you are making doesn’t just affect you — and it can have very long-lasting effects.

Objectives:

  • Discuss land use practices that affect Great Lakes wetlands.
  • Make decisions and recognize personal priorities with regard to wetlands.
  • Describe some of the economic factors that often drive land use decisions.

External Curriculum Materials

Details

Subject Areas:
Grade Levels: ,
Topics: , , ,
Great Lakes Literacy Principles: ,