Curriculum Filter Results

Great Lakes Geology and the Necessity of Locks

These lesson plans are intended to integrate an understanding of the geologic processes that resulted in the formation of the Great Lakeswith lock technology that was developed to optimize the Great Lakes as a transportation waterway. The primary focus of the unit is to address technology as defined by the DOE as, ” The innovation, change, or modification of the natural environment to satisfy perceived human needs and wants.”

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Making Great Lakes Connections

Groups of learners work on a single Great Lake and connecting waterway and then come together as a class to construct a simple three dimensional model of the Great Lakes. Individual groups also present their Great Lake and connecting waterway information.

Objectives

After participating in this activity, learners will be able to:

  • identify the Great Lakes and the bodies of water that connect specific Great Lakes with each other and with the Atlantic Ocean
  • describe the three-dimensional geography of the Great Lakes, including elevations
  • describe why locks are needed, and how a lock system works

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Density: Sea Water Mixing and Sinking

Two of the most important characteristics of ocean water are its temperature and salinity. Together they help govern the density of seawater, which is a major factor controlling the ocean’s vertical movements and layered circulation.

External Curriculum Materials

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